Child Psychology BPS104

£395.00

Learn how children develop psychologically as they grow, and what factors (such as learning, parenting styles, einforcement, and genetic makeup) influence their behaviour and thinking. Anyone who lives or works with children will gain valuable insights into child behaviour. Students of counselling or pscyhology will be better prepared to understand childhood influences on later adult behaviour.

SKU: BPS104 Category:

Description

Learn how children develop psychologically as they grow, and what factors (such as learning, parenting styles, enforcement, and genetic makeup) influence their behaviour and thinking. Anyone who lives or works with children will gain valuable insights into child behaviour. Students of counselling or psychology will be better prepared to understand childhood influences on later adult behaviour.

COURSE CONTENT

There are 12 lessons as follows:

  1. Introduction to Child Psychology: Levels of development, nature or nurture, isolating hereditary characteristics, cause versus correlation, continuity versus discontinuity, cross sectional and longitudinal studies, reliability of verbal reports
  2. The Newborn Infant: The Interactionist approach, range of reaction, niche picking, temperament stimulus seeking, emotional disturbances during pregnancy
  3. States and Senses of the Infant: Sensory discrimination, infant states (sleep, inactivity, waking, crying etc), why psychologists are concerned with defining and describing infant states, habituation, crying, soothing a distressed baby, sensory discrimination, depth perception, oral sensitivity
  4. Learning: Habituation, vicarious learning, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, reinforcement, the importance of learning control, etc
  5. Emotions and Socialisation: Producing and recognising emotional expression, smiling, biological explanation, perceptual recognition, mother-child Attachment, Freudian approach, Bowlby’s approach, Social Learning approach, Harlow’s approach, role of cognition in attachment formation, day care
  6. Cognitive Development: Developing the ability to reason.
  7. Language Development: Is language ability learned or innate? Social Learning Approach, Hypothesis testing approach, under extending
  8. Intelligence: Measuring Intelligence, Cultural Bias, IQ, and Testing Intelligence as a tool.
  9. Socialisation Part A: Social Cognition, self awareness, awareness of others, development of empathy, taking turns, having a point of view/perspective, social scripts, and pretend play
  10. Morality: Moral development, aggression and altruism, Freud, Piaget and Kohlberg on moral development
  11. Sexuality: Freud’s phases (oral phase, anal phase, phallic phase, latent phase, genital phase), gender and role Identity, psycho-social development
  12. Socialisation Part B: Family influence, discipline, siblings, family structures, school influence, peer influence, acceptance and rejection, modelling, reinforcement.

WHAT YOU MAY DO IN THIS COURSE

  • Identify environmental and social aspects required for the ‘ideal’ environment for a developing child.
  • Explain how genetic and environmental factors operate together in influencing the child’s personality development.
  • Provide evidence that a particular personality characteristic may be genetically determined.
  • Explain how genetic and environmental factors operate together in influencing the child’s personality development.
  • Name the kind of learning in which a stimulus which usually produces an unconditioned response is manipulated to produce a conditioned response, and give an example.
  • Discuss exactly how you would use operant conditioning to encourage a child to socialise.
  • Use the perceptual recognition approach to explain smiling and fear in infants.
  • Evaluate Freud’s, Harlow’s and Bowlby’s explanations of the formation of mother-child attachments different.
  • Explain reflection-impulsivity and its significance in cognitive development.
  • Explain the strengths and weakness of social learning theory in explaining language acquisition.
  • Explain why you think that intelligence is or is not overall genetically determined.